Did you know that more than half of the three billion toys and games sold in the U.S. are purchased during the holidays? Though stronger federal regulations and higher toymaker standards exist, a child’s safety is never guaranteed. Bevin Maynard, child advocate at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital, notes that appropriate selection and proper use of toys, combined with parental supervision, can greatly reduce the incidence and severity of toy-related injuries.

Maynard suggests:

  • Choose well-made toys suitable to the child’s age, interest and skill level. Contrary to popular belief, age labels are not intended as developmental ratings – they are for safety reasons.
  • Steer clear of toys containing lead paint.
  • When shopping for a child younger than 6-years-old, skip toys with small magnetic pieces.
  • When shopping for a child younger than 8-years-old, forgo electronic toys if they have a heating element, such as a battery or electrical plugs.
  • Avoid toys that produce loud noises. High-volume games can permanently impair a child’s hearing, and loud sounds can frighten a younger child.
  • Do not gift toys with strings, straps or cords longer than 7 inches.
  • Immediately discard plastic wrappings on toys before they become dangerous play things for young children.
  • If giving a ride-able toy, such as a bike or scooter, include a helmet as part of the gift.

Source: St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital

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